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McLeods Book

Farmers are quickly recognizing the benefits of a mineral called Zeolite as part of their fertiliser program, to reduce leaching of nutrients and reducing water usage by up to 60%.

Zeolite has a number of characteristics that provide this mineral with the capacity to both improve soil quality, including water retention and at the same time increase fertiliser efficiency through controlled slow release processes.

These abilities include high CEC (cation exchange capacity) and high porosity (up to 45%), combined with insoluble and durable characteristics. Through these properties, there is a conservation of water and fertiliser, increased yields and environmental benefits in regards to fertiliser leaching.

Zeolite is a hard, durable and insoluble mineral, which means that once applied to soils it has longterm stability and remains available for a large number of growing seasons. Through these properties Zeolite improves the physical and chemical properties of soil through moisture retention and slow release of NPK.

Reduce fertiliser leaching and water usage by up to 60%

1. One of the keys to the application of Zeolite is the slow release of NPK fertilisers. Zeolite reduces losses, also toxicity effects of NPK fertilisers, the most commonly used fertilisers, also some of the most soluble.

2. With the ability to retain moisture, Zeolite can greatly reduce irrigation time and volume or water used by up to 60%. This moisture is retained in the soil with out the influence of temperature variations.

Zeolite’s capacity to store and release water not only improves soil quality but generates a saving in water use.

3. Zeolite can decrease acidity by the release of basic nutrients, also depress mould fungi. Soil pH can also be lowered by the nitrification of ammonium ions released form fertilisers. Zeolite can reduce this nitrification process by storing the ammonium in exchange sites not accessible through virtue ofs the larger size nitrifying bacteria.

To find out more about the advantages of Zeolite and to Buy Bevan’s Book, Contact Us today.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

SECTION 1 1 – 8
PHOSPHORUS FERTILIZERS – THEIR CONTROL AND EFFECT
1. Introduction
2. Some General Insights
3. The Purpose of Phosphorus in Agriculture
4. The Main Phosphorus Fertilizers
5. The Use of Phosphate Rock as a Direct Application to Soils
6. Losses of Fertilizer Phosphorus – Phosphorus fixation, leaching, phosphorus removal in produce
7. Phosphorus Replacement
8. Soil and its Fragility
9. Conclusions

SECTION 2 1 – 5
BLUE-GREEN ALGAE (CYANOBACTERIA) IN INLAND WATER SYSTEMS – CAN THEY BE AVOIDED?
1. Introduction
2. Blue-Green Algae and Why They Occur
3. The Damage Caused by Blue-Green Algae
4. Main Sources of Nitrogen and Phosphorus
5. Conclusions

SECTION 3 1 – 8
OUR GREAT BARRIER REEF – ITS NUTRIENT ABUSE
1. Introduction
2. Background, Climate, Products of Run-off
3. Nutrients Entering the Marine Environment
4. Damage to the Great Barrier Reef – Its Nutrient Abuse
5. Measuring the Nutrient Levels in Marine Environments
6. The Damage Nutrient Promoted Algal Growth is causing to the Great Barrier Reef
7. State of the Marine Environment Report for Australia (Somer) 1996
8. Conclusions

SECTION 4
PHOSPHATE ROCK
1. Introduction
2. Occurrence of Phosphate Rock
3. The Processing of Phosphorus Fertilizers
4. Non-Fertilizer Uses of Phosphate Rock
5. Conclusions

SECTION 5 1-6
THE MINERAL ZEOLITE -ITS CHARACTERISTICS AND CAPABILITIES
1. Introduction
2. What is Zeolite?
3. What are the Physical Properties of Zeolite that are so Important?
4. How Zeolite Works
5. How was Zeolite Formed?
6. Purpose of Zeolite Application in the Agricultural and Horticultural Industries
7. Environmental Issues
8. Conclusions

SECTION 6 1-6
THE ROLE OF ZEOLITE CAN PLAY IN THE MANAGEMENT OF PLANT FERTILITY
1) Introduction
2) Mobilising the Phosphorus in Phosphate Rock by Adding Zeolite
3) The Application of Zeolite to Increase Fertilizer Efficiency and Reduce Environmental Damage
4) Use of Zeolite-Phosphate Rock in the Colonisation of Outer Space
5) Application Rates of Zeolite/Phosphate Rock
6) Significance to the Environment of Zeolite/Phosphate Rock Technology
7) Conclusions

PREFACE

We have witnessed enormous changes in science, particularly during , the 20th Century.
In previous centuries, humans have been sustained by native fruits, vegetables and hunted animals. Expanded populations have resulted from the increased ability to supply food.
This was brought about by agricultural science through improved plants, more intense crop cultivation and the supply of chemicals as fertilizers, insecticides, preservatives, etc.
At the same time, medical science has provided an avenue for an increase in the life span of the human species.

These sciences have combined to provide the world with expanding populations, with more mouths to feed (currently at a growth rate of 90 million per year) and more chemicals necessary to produce this increased food requirement. There has been a downside, a serious environmental downside. Because of our need to intensify crop production form soils whose qualities are gradually being depleted, excesses of ‘quick-fix’ soluble chemical fertilizers have been added. The excesses of these fertilizers have found their way into our water systems, polluting both our freshwater and some of our treasured marine environments.
Damaging algal growth has flourished and proliferated, to compete with and replace other natural forms of aquatic life. It should be of concern t us all that most of this damage appears to have taken place in Australia in such a relatively short term, of about 70 years.

In order to preserve the quality of water, so essential to all living things, this spiralling cycle must be broken. Increasing quantities of food need to be produced, with increased quantities of fertilizers applied. We have to question if there is not a better way of producing our food supplies, without the degradation of our precious water resources.
This paper attempts to address some of these issues as they apply to Australia and offers a way to increase fertilizer efficiency, thus improving the aquatic environment, all without diminishing the ability to produce our own food supplies whilst at the same time contributing to the world’s expanding food requirements.

To find out more about the advantages of Zeolite and to Buy Bevan’s Book, Contact Us today.

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